28
Feb
19

Here in the aftermath…

“Sir, we wish to see Jesus.” (John 12:21, NRSV)

GC2019 floorToday, words fail.

And yet, I have always been encouraged that the attempt to assemble appropriate words can often be the beginning point of the process of healing.

So I press on…

I traveled to St. Louis, MO early Monday morning to observe the proceedings of the special session of the General Conference of the United Methodist Church. It was a session with one task on hand: to resolve, once and for all, more than 45 years of bitter wrangling in the church over whether or not we will include lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer people in the life of the church.

While it is true that the two main issues at stake in General Conference 2019 were whether the United Methodist Church would permit LGBTQ+ people to be ordained as pastors and whether UMC pastors will be able to perform same-sex weddings, the real issue was inclusion.

Because if we assign one group of people a different, diminished set of rights than other people enjoy, we effectively exclude them.

I went to St. Louis hopeful. For months and months, I have heard a groundswell of support for something called the One Church Plan. The One Church Plan was structured to allow progressive United Methodist congregations to stay progressive, centrist congregations to stay centrist, and conservative congregations to stay conservative… while all still continuing life under the United Methodist tent

It seemed like a no-brainer.

But when I arrived I was reminded: the gathering in St. Louis was a global gathering. It was made up of not only delegates from North America (2/3 of whom said they supported the One Church Plan), but also delegates from Europe, Central and South American, the Philippines, and sub-Saharan Africa… where the UM church is seeing its most dynamic growth.

I was also reminded that many of these global delegates come from countries where homosexuality is a crime punishable by fine, jail time and in some instances, corporal punishment.

And yet, even on the four-hour drive from Kansas City to St. Louis, I was still hopeful. For the last eight months, I have been praying daily for the conference and the delegates. My prayer has been for God’s spirit to move through the hearts and minds of each delegate and that LOVE be the guiding force in the deliberations in St. Louis.

Since entering the ministry in 2001, I have seen firsthand the damage our church’s current policy has done to people who are something other than heterosexual.  My fervent hope has been that the church might no longer be an instrument of injury in those lives and would instead start being an instrument of healing and welcome.

The best chance for something new to happen was General Conference 2019

OCP voteYet those hopes were dashed Monday afternoon as the One Church Plan was defeated by 50 votes… then dashed further as the Traditional Plan– featuring even stricter condemnations of LGBTQ+ persons – was passed.

I was heartbroken.

Today I am still heartbroken. I am heartbroken as a person. I am heartbroken as a member of the United Methodist Church. I am heartbroken as the pastoral leader of two United Methodist congregations. I am sure I am still in the aftermath of the moment of trauma, but right now I feel like my mother just evicted and disowned me.

No one is terribly clear where things are going from here. Some people are talking about leaving the denomination altogether. Some people are talking about organizing an effort to “de-globalize” the United Methodist Church, making the North American church its own discrete entity with its own Book of Discipline. Some are saying this has been their church home since birth and will continue to be, no matter what.

And some – I imagine – are rejoicing that the United Methodist Church has finally “done the right thing” and “followed God’s teaching.”

For me for now, fretting over the future of the United Methodist Church does nothing good for my soul right now. I have to try and remember that my call is to discern and do God’s will in this next moment… and the moment after that… and the moment after that… for the rest of my life.

I pray that people are somehow able to see the face of Jesus even through the thick fog that is often produced by his church.

I pray for the healing of LGBTQ+ United Methodist people who have heard this ruling from the church and in it heard the words, “Because of who you are, you don’t belong here.”

God bless each of you. This is not the end of God’s story. It might just be the beginning of something extraordinary and new.


7 Responses to “Here in the aftermath…”


  1. February 28, 2019 at 2:49 pm

    LGBT is not who they are. I know of no other group that uses their sin as their identity. They are welcome. But they are also going to be told the truth that they need to turn from their sin and turn to Jesus Christ.

    • February 28, 2019 at 5:21 pm

      Won’t it be a shock and surprise when you arrive at the Pearly Gates one day and find out that God made LGBT people exactly as they are for a divine purpose? And then you will be reminded of the fact that you chose to remain blind to that purpose? When that happens, you are going to have some serious ‘splaining to do, IMHO.

  2. February 28, 2019 at 10:50 pm

    You seem to be making a lot of assumptions about the motives of those who disagree with you. People who believe in the truth of Scripture aren’t necessarily “condemning the people,” as you put it. At least, I don’t know any who do.
    Your desire for the Church to be loving is admirable, but any parent will tell you that you don’t have to approve of everything someone does to love them with all your heart. Jesus saw our sin, and loved us enough to die so we could be liberated from it.

    • March 1, 2019 at 12:00 am

      When we label a given human condition (such as race, eye color, left-or-right-handedness, or sexuality) as “sin” we are indeed engaging in condemnation. We are saying, “The way you were created is wrong.”

      I’m sorry, I cannot agree that God created any mistakes. I do, however, agree that God created people – myself absolutely included – with incomplete understandings of God’s designs and intentions for his world. I am trying every day (with the help of Scripture, reason, experience, and religious tradition) to arrive at a more complete understanding, but find myself a long way from that goal. I thank God for people like you for your attempts to help move me further down that road.

  3. March 15, 2019 at 4:22 pm

    Your post reminds me of a decision my Church made about four years ago, regarding the ordination of women. We were hopeful, but we forgot, like you, that the global church votes. I pray that as Christians we will understand that it is not our job to craft people into OUR image or to stand guard at the gates of Heaven. It is our commission to point the way to Christ. It is our spiritual duty to uphold the spirit of the law–love. Love. Love. Love.


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