Posts Tagged ‘change

02
Jan
19

Will and Grace

New Year resolutions“A NEW YEAR… A NEW YOU.”

That was either the advertising slogan of Weight Watchers or my health club. Maybe both.

Sounds good, doesn’t it? But as I stood there and did my assessment in front of the mirror this morning, it all looked strangely familiar.

Same gray and graying hair… same wrinkles around the eyes… same wobble under the chin… the same endearing paunch just above the belt there.

And then I did the “deeper dive” for the appraisal of that other, unseen me to try and discover what kind of newness I might find inside here.

Hmmmm… very familiar landscape in here, too. I know I am sure I’ve seen that laziness before. That impatience rings a bell, too. Likewise the neurotic perfectionism, the judgementalism, and that startling lack of consideration for the needs of others.

You know, if I didn’t know better, I would say that the much-ballyhooed “new me” in those advertising slogans is all smoke, mirrors, and marketing.

So far the 2019 Russell looks very much like 2018 Russell… inside and out.

So what does it take, do you suppose, to bring about meaningful personal change in any of us? What can we do when we decide that things simply can’t go on as they are?

Over the years I’ve learned that it takes more than the flip of a calendar page and a few sprinkles of promotional “fairy dust” to bring about any sort of meaningful transformation.

When faced with the need to change, one of our first temptations usually is to bear down, muster all the strength and willpower we can and vigorously attack the problem. We – especially the males among us – get a feeling of power and purpose when we have a very specific “mountain” we need to climb.

However, wise people who work with addiction recovery have taught me that personal transformation almost always takes something quite different than the application of brains and brawn.

In fact, it usually takes the exact opposite.

They have taught me it takes something a lot less like an Army Airborne Ranger’s approach and something much more in line with Jesus’ approach.

True, lasting, profound change, they insist, moves from the inside out… it does not move in the other direction.

Step 1 of the twelve steps of recovery puts it this way: “We admitted we were powerless… — that our lives had become unmanageable.”

In his Sermon on the Mount, Jesus put it this way: “Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.” (Matthew 5:3, NRSV). Or this way, “For those who want to save their life will lose it, and those who lose their life for my sake, and for the sake of the gospel, will save it…”(Mark 8:35, NRSV).

Will and Grace isn’t just the name of a television show. It is the choice we are offered in the pursuit of transformation.

In the full version of his famous Serenity Prayer, theologian Reinhold Neibuhr gives this great advice for entering a new year, looking for a transformation in our lives. He says we should take…

… as Jesus did,
This sinful world as it is,
Not as I would have it,
Trusting that You will make all things right,
If I surrender to Your will,
So that I may be reasonably happy in this life,
And supremely happy with You forever in the next.

 

Blessings and good health for each of you in the year ahead.

28
Mar
17

DO IT

Action picture“Wow!” my wife remarked to our friend Bill recently as we sat down with he and his wife for dinner… (not his real name, by the way. But I’m not changing it to protect him from embarrassment. I’m changing it because I am about to say something very positive about him and don’t want him to get all full of himself)… She continued, “You really look good! You look like you’ve lost some weight!”

“Yes,” Bill replied. “A bit over 35 pounds.”

And then the accolades and “atta-boys” really started pouring in. I said, “That’s fantastic! Way to go! I sure wish I could muster up that kind of will power myself!”

“Well,” Bill said, “The thing that really helps with that will power thing is when your doctor tells you that you are at risk for a stroke and diabetes if you don’t get your weight under control.”

Yes, I am sure that statement is absolutely true. A frightening prognosis like that would probably get me off my flabby backside quicker than you can say, “Cholesterol.”

But even with an ample supply of sound, scary medical information, Bill still had to ACT on it. He had to be the one to actually turn down the bread and pasta and potatoes and other carbohydrate-loaded foods and choose something else to eat.

HE had to get himself to the gym and do the exercise that burned up some of his excess fat.

HE had to find a way to ignore the little voices telling him that “one little potato chip won’t hurt,” or that no one was looking or that he OWED IT to himself to celebrate his progress and cheat a little with a banana split.

So yes, Bill… even though you were quick to brush it off, you richly deserved the praise we offered.

After saying good night and going our separate ways, I began to think about my own situation and areas of my life where a change of attitude or behavior is needed. And I will confess that while my imprudent approach to eating is certainly one of those areas, it is far from the only one.

I also realized that in every single one of those “areas for improvement”, it is not a lack of information that stalls me.

It is a lack of ACTION.

Paolo Friere, the Brazilian educator, said it this way: “We make the road by walking.”

Morganna Bailey, in her recent TED Talk put it this way: “Clarity comes from ACTING, not from thinking.”

Author Randa Abdel-Fattah said, “Belief means nothing without actions.”

Mark Twain was a little wittier when he said the same thing: “Actions speak louder than words, but not as often.”

And finally Jesus of Nazareth said it like this: “Not everyone who says to me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ will enter the kingdom of heaven, but only the one who does the will of my Father in heaven.” (Matthew 7:21, NRSV). (Emphasis mine. But I’m sure Jesus would agree.)

Yes, yes. But don’t these people understand that acting can be a little SCARY? Because once you act… once you DO a certain, tangible thing, or take a concrete STEP, you can’t un-act.

We don’t have the same magic editing functions on our actions that come with this lovely word-processing software I’m using here. That software lets me go back, erase, rewrite, revise, and perfect these words until they are JUST RIGHT.

My actions are forever what they originally were.

Maybe that explains the popularity of the many forms of social media these days. Facebook, Instagram, SnapChat, and Twitter allow us to believe and speak things with gusto and passion without actually requiring that we take any sort of ACTION.

In the end though, it may all be exactly what Shakespeare called it: “Much ado about nothing.”

So where are you willing to act today? What purposeful deed can flow from your well-developed system of beliefs?

Think about it.

 

Then ACT.




Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Follow Russellings of the Spirit on WordPress.com

%d bloggers like this: